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The Brunel Museum

Museums and Art Galleries, Indoor and Outdoor
Profile iconAll Ages
Location iconRotherhithe
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Attraction Information

Discover London’s quirkiest museum, The Brunel Museum! Famous for the world’s first tunnel under a navigable river, and the first underground party in 1827, it’s a museum unlike any other.

As you descend into the depths of the grade II listed Tunnel Shaft, you will learn of its eccentric history of art and engineering. The Tunnel Shaft has reopened for the first time in 150 years! It was used for underground fairs and banquets inside the Thames tunnel which was described as the ‘Eighth Wonder of the World’ in the mid-nineteenth century. This fascinating space is presently used to host live music, theatre, museum tours and cinema nights. And of course, let's not forget the exciting and unique seasonal events that are run throughout the year, such as the Midnight Apothecary. Visit the Engine Room for an up close inspection of interesting artefacts, documents and integral parts of the tunnel's history too.

Why not explore the three-level landscaped gardens while you’re at it? Each garden is situated in a different direction, circling the tunnel, for a different perspective of London. Admire the view of England's most famous river, catch some Summer shade under the Frankenstein Tree or explore the different sculptures and artworks in the gardens, made by local children and artists.

- London’s quirkiest museum
- Grade II listed building
- Exciting seasonal events, cinema nights and live music in the tunnel

Opening hours

Winter Opening Times
Saturday and Sunday, 11:00 to 15:30

Last Entry

last entry 3pm

Location

Address

Railway Ave, London SE16 4LF,
London,
Greater London,
SE16 4LF,
England

Phone number

020 7231 3840

Pricing

General admission: £6
Concession/Child: £4
Family ticket: £10

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FAQ & Additional Information

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